How To Develop Double Exposure Photos

To develop your own double exposure photos, you will need a few materials. These are:

- A dark room (A room with absolutely NO LIGHT)

- 35 mm camera 

- 35 mm film 

- A film tank

- A bottle opener

- Developer

- Scissors 

- Stop Bath

- Photo Flo 

- A sink (or a tub of water) 

- A timer

- A safe light 

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Now once you’ve purchased the necessary materials it’s time to start taking pictures! 

This is what a double exposure looks like: 

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1. Load the film into the camera. First, lift the rewinding crank upwards. This opens up the back of the camera, allowing you to load the 35 mm film. 

Then, load the 35 mm film canister into its chamber (usually located on the left hand side). Next pull out the leader of the film and slide it into the slot of the take-up spool. 

Close the back up and put down the rewind crank. Be sure to rewind the frame counter to 0 before you start taking pictures. 

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2. Go to an area with a wide variety of photo oppurtunities. (A park, shopping center, school, city, etc) 

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2. Find something to take a picture of and focus the camera on it. To do so, adjust the aperture ring on the lens of the camera, until the image you’re focusing on appears looks sharp, clear, and precise. 

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4. Ensure that the amount of light the film will be exposed to is perfect. To do this, adjust the shutter speed dial.

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3.  Make sure that the image does not take up the entire space of the picture. You want to leave some “free” space to make room for the other image.

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3. Snap the picture.

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4. Rewind the camera until you hear a click.Next, advance the film forward twice. This re-positions the first picture you took back into the “exposure seat” so that the picture you are about to take will be overlapping onto the original shot. Then, focus the camera on another image, with the free space in the opposite area of the previous one. Snap the picture again. 

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5. Continue to do this until you run out of film. 

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Now that you’ve taken all of your photos, you have to develop the negatives. 

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1. Take the top off of the film with a bottle opener. 

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2. Unravel the film and cut the “tongue” of it off with scissors. 

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3. Place the film onto the reel inside of the tank. 

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2. Pour the developer into the film tank. Mix for 11 minutes. Agitate for the first 10 seconds of every minute.After each agitation tap the tank on the table twice to remove air bubbles. Pour the developer down drain after use

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3.  Pour Stop Bath into the tank. Mix continuously for 30 seconds.Tap the tank on the table twice after mixing to remove air bubbles. Then, pour the stop solution back into the container for reuse

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4. Pour the fixer into the tank. Mix for 5 minutes. Agitate for the first 10 seconds of every minute. After each agitation tap the tank on the table twice to remove air bubbles. Pour fixer back into the container for reuse. 

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5. Open the tank; Don’t worry you can now expose the negatives to light. Rinse the film for 5 minutes under running tap water.

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6. Pour in the Photo Flo and lightly agitate for 30 seconds continuously. Pour photo-flo back into container for reuse.

 

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7. Hang your film up to dry. DO NOT TOUCH. 

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Now that you’ve developed the film, you can print your pictures. 

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1. Go back into the dark room. Check to make sure that there is absolutely NO LIGHT. 

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2. Set up your enlarger and take out and open your negative carrier. Slightly bend the negative and put it under the pegs that will hold it in place. Put the negative in with the emulsion side down. It will look backwards, and upside down. (But it will look normal when projected).

Use this diagram to help you with the next few steps. 

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3. Adjust the negative so that you can see the photo you want to print. Close the negative carrier and put it back inside of the enlarger. Next, position the easel underneath the enlarger, and raise or lower the head so that the picture is placed properly. 

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4. Test strips are used to determine how long to expose your photo for. Take one sheet of paper, and cut into 1 inch strips. Lay one strip diagonally across the easel. Set your timer for 30 seconds. Using a piece of black paper or cardboard, expose a small amount of the strip every 5 seconds. You will end up with bars on the paper when you develop it, one exposed for 5 seconds, one for 10, one for 15, etc. Process the test strip as usual through fixer (more on this later). Wash it off. From there, determine which time worked best for you and use that on the real photo. 

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5. Place a full piece of paper onto the easel. Set the timer to the time that you picked from your test strip. Turn on the timer and expose the paper. 

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6. Wash the photo in Developer for 1-3 minutes. 

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7. Wash the photo in Stop Bath for 5-10 seconds.

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8.  Wash the photo in Fixer for 1 minute. 

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9. Bring your photo to the sink and wash it under running water for 1-5 minutes. 

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10. Hang your photo up to dry.

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Now you’ve successfully developed a black and white double exposure! Congratulations! 

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